This is the documentation of the development version, check the Stable Version documentation.

JSON Web Token (JWT)

JSON Web Token (JWT) is structured by RFC7515: JSON Web Signature or RFC7516: JSON Web Encryption with certain payload claims. The JWT implementation in Authlib has all built-in algorithms via RFC7518: JSON Web Algorithms, it can also load private/public keys of RFC7517: JSON Web Key:

>>> from authlib.jose import jwt
>>> header = {'alg': 'RS256'}
>>> payload = {'iss': 'Authlib', 'sub': '123', ...}
>>> key = read_file('private.pem')
>>> s = jwt.encode(header, payload, key)
>>> claims = jwt.decode(s, read_file('public.pem'))
>>> print(claims)
{'iss': 'Authlib', 'sub': '123', ...}
>>> print(claims.header)
{'alg': 'RS256', 'typ': 'JWT'}
>>> claims.validate()

The imported jwt is an instance of JsonWebToken. It has all supported JWS algorithms, and it can handle JWK automatically. When JsonWebToken.encode() a payload, JWT will check payload claims for security, if you really want to expose them, you can always turn it off via check=False.

Important

JWT payload with JWS is not encrypted, it is just signed. Anyone can extract the payload without any private or public keys. Adding sensitive data like passwords, social security numbers in JWT payload is not safe if you are going to send them in a non-secure connection.

You can also use JWT with JWE which is encrypted. But this feature is not mature, documentation is not provided yet.

JWT Encode

jwt.encode is the method to create a JSON Web Token string. It encodes the payload with the given alg in header:

>>> from authlib.jose import jwt
>>> headers = {'alg': 'RS256'}
>>> payload = {'iss': 'Authlib', 'sub': '123', ...}
>>> key = read_file('private.pem')
>>> s = jwt.encode(header, payload, key)

The available keys in headers are defined by RFC7515: JSON Web Signature.

JWT Decode

jwt.decode is the method to translate a JSON Web Token string into the dict of the payload:

>>> from authlib.jose import jwt
>>> claims = jwt.decode(s, read_file('public.pem'))

The returned value is a JWTClaims, check the next section to validate claims value.

JWT with limited Algorithms

There are cases that we don’t want to support all the alg values, especially when decoding a token. In this case, we can pass a list of supported alg into JsonWebToken:

>>> from authlib.jose import JsonWebToken
>>> jwt = JsonWebToken(['RS256'])

JWT Payload Claims Validation

JsonWebToken.decode() accepts 3 claims-related parameters: claims_cls, claims_option and claims_params. The default claims_cls is JWTClaims. The decode method returns:

>>> JWTClaims(payload, header, options=claims_options, params=claims_params)

Claims validation is actually handled by JWTClaims.validate(), which validates payload claims with claims_option and claims_params. For standard JWTClaims, claims_params value is not used, but it is used in IDToken.

Here is an example of claims_option:

{
    "iss": {
        "essential": True,
        "values": ["https://example.com", "https://example.org"]
    },
    "sub": {
        "essential": True
        "value": "248289761001"
    },
    "jti": {
        "validate": validate_jti
    }
}

It is a dict configuration, the option key is the name of a claim.

  • essential: this value is REQUIRED.
  • values: claim value can be any one in the values list.
  • value: claim value MUST be the same value.
  • validate: a function to validate the claim value.